Postoperative Infectious Complications Impact Long-Term Survival in Patients Who Underwent Hepatectomies for Colorectal Liver Metastases: a Propensity Score Matching Analysis Infezioni in chirurgia

Postoperative Infectious Complications Impact Long-Term Survival in Patients Who Underwent Hepatectomies for Colorectal Liver Metastases: a Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

OBJECTIVE:

Postoperative complications strongly impact the postoperative course and long-term outcome of patients who underwent liver resection for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). Among them, infectious complications play a relevant role. The aim of this study was to evaluate if infectious complications still impact overall and disease-free survival after liver resection for CRLM once patients were matched with a propensity score matching analysis based on Fong’s criteria.

METHODS:

A total of 2281 hepatectomies were analyzed from a multicentric retrospective cohort of hepatectomies. Patients were matched with a 1:3 propensity score analysis in order to compare patients with (INF+) and without (INF-) postoperative infectious complications.

RESULTS:

Major resection (OR = 1.69 (1.01-2.89), p = 0.05) and operative time (OR = 1.1 (1.1-1.3), p = 0.05) were identified as risk factors of infectious complications. After propensity score matching, infectious complications are associated with overall survival (OS), with 1-, 3-, 5-year OS at 94, 81, and 66% in INF- and 92, 66, and 57% in INF+ respectively (p = 0.01). Disease-free survival (DFS) was also different with regard to 1-, 3-, 5-year survival at 65, 41, and 22% in R0 vs. 50, 28, and 17% in INF+ (p = 0.007).

CONCLUSION:

Infectious complications are associated with decreased overall and disease-free survival rates.

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